IMAGE CREDIT: Photo by AMC SPOILERS BELOW! I wanted to get this done yesterday. Really, I did. But that episode needed two views because it was a beautiful thing. I saw one reviewer who noted that he felt handled throughout the episode, and I felt similarly. And like that reviewer –I can’t remember who it was or I’d link– I found it perfectly fine, too. The episode was vintage Mad Men, and just because I could see behind the curtain a little bit didn’t

So, I’m watching the scene with my precious Kenny and my mouth drops. I was actually hoping for a dream sequence to close that scene though I abhor those machinations generally. I’ll take it if it means that Kenny’s spared that injury and indignity. Anyway, Kenny’s line, “Chevy’s killing me,” doesn’t feel quite that hyperbolic after that scene. Poor Ken. Pete is perfect for that account and will finally get a chance to use that .22 of his. Speaking of

Well, that episode was kind of a big deal. And the walls come crashing down!! I wish it hadn’t fallen to Sally to bring Don’s recently-constructed glass house to the ground. She’s been let down so many times by the adults in her life, and I had hoped that her glimpse into Roger and her step-grandmother’s sexual side might be her last inappropriate brush with the secret lives of grown-ups. I can’t imagine her healing from this enormous betrayal by

Happy Memorial Day!! A few brief thoughts since today is a holiday and I’m ready to get outside and enjoy the beautiful day: Unless I misheard, Peggy had the line of the episode talking about Ted vs. Don and the navigating she and the rest of the agency are doing to accommodate the two giant egos. “The difference is that he’s interested in the idea, and you’re interested in your idea.” That is the truth nougat right there. And it’s

Another episode filled with flashbacks to Don’s childhood. What’s interesting about Don and his obsession with his less than Norman Rockwell childhood is that he’s so ashamed of it and yet it’s something he had no control over. However, he’s not the slightest bit ashamed of his adultery, his failure as a parent, or the way he manipulates and even bullies those around him to get his way (poor Sylvia) all of which he has complete control over. That opening

NOTE: Spoilers Below Abe is a nice foil to the rest of the male characters that we spend time with in ‘Mad Men’ world, and I really love the glimpses into his character. It’s too bad there’s no real passion in his and Peggy’s relationship because there’s a nice easiness there. There seems to be something more than the professional between Peggy and Ted. In that scene between Peggy, Ted, and Ted’s wife, I got the distinct impression that Ted might