Don Draper (Jon Hamm) and Sally Draper (Kiernan Shipka) Photo by Michael Yarish/AMC

IMAGE CREDIT: Photo by Michael Yarish/AMC (SPOILERS BELOW) Before the episode even starts, the previouslies promise me that I’ll get at least some development on the Don and Sally story line. Let’s do this! Watching the partners’ conference call was hilarious and illuminating as the power hierarchy becomes ever more evident. I am somewhat amazed to find Cutler at the top of the power structure all alone unless I’m confused. It was fun watching everyone adjusting to their new normal of meeting via conference

(SPOILERS BELOW) FREDDY! Wait, Freddy? As I was listening to him deliver that  campaign, all I could think was, “Freddy has come a long way since the pissing-the-pants days. I had no idea he was capable of anything of that caliber, and I did have a little nagging piece of a thought kernel in the back of my mind that I should have realized was worthy of inspection. I’m sure I was the only person who thought to myself, “Oh,

There was so much to process about this episode. It makes me already anxious for next season to see what will become of so many of these characters that are facing some very big changes: Peggy is sitting in Don’s chair and looks like she’s ready to take NY by storm. Pete is unencumbered and looks cheerful (rare for him) and ready for a new challenge. Ted and family are relocating to L.A. to start fresh as far away from

So, I’m watching the scene with my precious Kenny and my mouth drops. I was actually hoping for a dream sequence to close that scene though I abhor those machinations generally. I’ll take it if it means that Kenny’s spared that injury and indignity. Anyway, Kenny’s line, “Chevy’s killing me,” doesn’t feel quite that hyperbolic after that scene. Poor Ken. Pete is perfect for that account and will finally get a chance to use that .22 of his. Speaking of

Well, that episode was kind of a big deal. And the walls come crashing down!! I wish it hadn’t fallen to Sally to bring Don’s recently-constructed glass house to the ground. She’s been let down so many times by the adults in her life, and I had hoped that her glimpse into Roger and her step-grandmother’s sexual side might be her last inappropriate brush with the secret lives of grown-ups. I can’t imagine her healing from this enormous betrayal by

Another episode filled with flashbacks to Don’s childhood. What’s interesting about Don and his obsession with his less than Norman Rockwell childhood is that he’s so ashamed of it and yet it’s something he had no control over. However, he’s not the slightest bit ashamed of his adultery, his failure as a parent, or the way he manipulates and even bullies those around him to get his way (poor Sylvia) all of which he has complete control over. That opening