Thoughts on Mad Men: Season 7, The Forecast (SPOILERS)

IMAGE CREDIT: Photo by AMC

SPOILERS BELOW!

Finally, one I could really sink my teeth into. I have to start at the end with that look of panic on Don’s face when the realtor looks at him after she confirms that she’s sold his place and says something about finding him a new one. Sheer panic. At a new start. How many times have we seen Don jump at the chance at a new start? Usually it’s been with a woman, though there have been some business ones as well. They’ve all been met with enthusiasm. Eagerness. I can’t recall EVER seeing panic on Don’s face at the idea of starting over. Even during his Hershey pitch performance of self-destruction that he orchestrated. He knew what he was doing during that meeting, but you didn’t see any panic. You saw severe and soul-crushing depression later, yes. As he understood that he had well and truly lost everything and realized that he actually missed it after all. But, Don’s always run towards a clean slate. Probably because he’s always been running away from something else.

But not this time. And that’s why I have yet another confirmation that the boy (man) who’s been crying wolf for so many years has actually seen the wolf. Don really wants to make himself over completely. Sure, he’s not going to take any shit from the little brat that came to him for advice and then didn’t have the sense to suss out the message because the kid’s an idiot. But Don was perfectly willing to take Megan’s blows last week because they were warranted. But Mathis is a junior wannabe with energy and no real talent to boast about. And on top of that, he’s not even savvy enough to know how to fix his own mistakes. I mean think about it. Don’s almost roasted himself by talking about a gentle suicidal stroll into the Hawaiian surf (which was lovely image-wise and artistic as hell, although completely misguided for the client), and finally did the trick by talking to the Hershey folks who stared aghast as he regaled them with tales of growing up in a whorehouse and how that made him think of how much he loves Hershey’s. Hell, Rumsfeld had to finally piss himself to get the final boot and that was almost a noble exit. This kid can’t talk his way out of an f-bomb? Seriously? Yeah, kid, you don’t so much belong in the big leagues. So, no, Don’s not going to take shit from someone so ridiculous as that. But the words that kid uttered from someone Don respected? They would have packed quite a punch because Don’s trying, and I think he’s starting to recognize that nobody has his back. He’s a losing bet. His tenuous relationship with Sally is back on the rocks. He’d probably recognize that a good piece of that is the personal navigation a teen is trying to survive and take some of it with a grain of salt. Betty certainly understands that. Her interaction with Sally was surprisingly normal and, dare I say it, charming? Roger went to Ted before he went to “carousel Don” for the golden speech. Peggy sees right through Don’s agenda and cuts him down to size. She’s sick of being everyone’s pawn. The alliance they had forged is again on shaky ground. Everyone sees Don as a ticking time bomb. Don is just finally seeing that this is how he is viewed by even the “lowliest” members of the staff. It’s a wake-up call. It’s a bit hard to believe he’s missed how badly damaged and, in fact, possibly beyond repair his reputation has become while he’s been busy working on remaking himself.

I think that final shot of Don’s face is meant to show that he’s going to really do it this time. For himself and nobody else. Whether that means he’s going to get on that bus Sally mentioned and go far away from “Don and Betty” as Sally intends and try things Sally’s way with a brand new start free of any trace of the old remnants of before; or whether he’s going to start over by taking the speedy descent from his balcony before the new owners take possession in 30 days; or whether, best of all, he tries something a little less “burn the house down” and really does figure out how to start over, miraculously leaving all traces of destructive Don behind…..well your guess is as good as mine.

Notes

  • Ted’s going to die. I’ve got nothing more to say about it except this. I’m very sad to see this character reduced to what we are seeing now. Particularly with that ridiculous lip-rider. As GOB would say, “Oh, come ON!” Listen, Ted’s better than this, and I’m not going to be happy if this is all we are given for his exit. Plus, I’m going to hate Don for dragging him into this deal and killing him slowly day by day. Ted was never meant to be Roger, and his morphing into Rog is incredibly depressing because we know Ted’s character. And this is why I circle back to my first statement. Ted can’t exist in this state. He’s going to die and it will be an incredibly emotional situation like Lane Pryce. You heard it here first. I hope I’m wrong.
  • The fact that Robert has that initial and very intense reaction to the fact that Joan has a very young son doesn’t bode well as far as I can see. I’d very much like to see things work out for Joan, but such an intense reaction is hard to overcome. I’d have a lot of trouble believing he’d soften and accept a young family after that.
  • I was charmed by Sally and Glenn’s relationship. I’d prefer not to delve into Glenn and Betty’s only because they have something that bonds them and I have yet to determine what that is. Maybe it’s as simple as parents that never really saw them for who they are? But it seems deeper than that. But Sally and Glenn clearly care about each other very much, and that response that Sally had to Glenn’s announcement was so genuine. I continue to think Sally may be one of the most mature characters on the show despite the ups and downs emotionally that she is experiencing in the teen years. She is clearly very perceptive and is able to read most people almost as well as she is able to read her parents. That is a lot of information for someone of her age to process. Thankfully, she is reasonably mature, so she handles herself pretty well in a world too adult for her to be navigating at her age.

I’m done for now, but I think I’ll have more to add to this later. This episode was my favorite so far. So much to chew on. So many avenues to explore. So many trails to potentially follow to the finale.

Thoughts on Mad Men: Season 7, Waterloo (SPOILERS)

IMAGE CREDIT: Photo by Jaimie Trueblood/AMC

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Don’s no angel. He’s about as flawed as a human can get. And yet, Weiner and co. have done such a fine job crafting this complex, complete, and sympathetic character that I find myself rooting for Don over one of my all-time favorites: Joan. I’m glad they finally explained Joan’s animosity towards Don. It makes perfect sense that money trumps friendship for her. It has to. She’s a single parent. I really can’t fathom how difficult it would be to raise a child in those times with the double standards she faced and that suffocating glass ceiling that even she can’t surmount. This was why last week’s revelation that even Joan will hold out for love instead of accepting Bob’s pragmatic “offer” for the sake of her child was heartbreaking and touching. To find out that ball-buster Joan is a romantic at heart really makes her storyline all the more tragic. And that we are getting this insight into Joan now, allowing us to look back on all that she has endured throughout the course of the series, makes the impact more forceful. What’s worse for me is that, while Don’s childhood was certainly not self-inflicted, the fact that he continues to redefine what it means to hit his own rock bottom certainly has been. That I should be rooting for Don now and angry at Joan for trying to eject him from the firm is outrageous. He has brought all of this on himself. And yet, I’m fully on team Don. Is it Jon Hamm? Is it Weiner? I’m guessing it is a combination of superior work on both of their parts. To clarify, I don’t mean to say that Christina Hendricks isn’t knocking it out of the ballpark. She’s wonderful in that role. I have always adored that character, and I feel that the character’s arc has been satisfying and realistic.

Goodbye Bert Cooper

We knew someone would probably be leaving us this year. Did you see his face as Apollo 11 launched? That was a face of satisfaction and completion. (You can see in his later reaction to the moon landing that he never doubted that the mission would be a success.) Anyone who was watching this episode with the knowledge that one of the characters was going to die would know it was Bert. Robert Morse performed a Jon Hamm facial delivery of lines in that scene. I’ve had a love/hate relationship with Bert over the course of the series. It’s been love up until the past few episodes when I thought his hatred of Don was a bit outsized for the passage of time. But Bert’s loss will definitely be felt because he grounded them. It was interesting to see how quickly Roger was able to manage his grief and become galvanized. I fully expected Roger to wallow, so that was one of the better reactions to Bert’s death that we saw. Certainly Cutler’s reaction was the worst. Wholly expected but no less despicable.

The fantastic Morse musical number at the end of the episode was a real treat. I’ll admit to wearing the exact same expression that Don wore for the first few seconds because it came out of left field, and I struggled to ascertain what it meant for Don’s state of mind. Then, I just relaxed and enjoyed it. I told myself that Don’s unpickling brain is saying goodbye in the only way it can. I refuse to assume that Don will head for the bottle as a reaction to Bert’s ghostly reappearance.

Cutler Makes His Power Play

“You think you’re going to throw me out of my own company?” – Don.

Here’s the thing. Cutler should have known he didn’t have the pieces in place quite yet to make this move. He had to know that Don would make another move that would have given him two justifications to fire Don for cause. I imagine he thought he had Bert firmly in his corner. I actually thought he did, too. But Harry hadn’t signed the agreement yet. So why do this now? But I’m certainly glad Cutler made the play because I love a fired-up Don, and the scene of gathered partners was a delight to witness. Don’s face when he saw Joan vote against him was sad, but his recovery was swift. It’s great to see that he’s in game play mode.

“You’re just a bully and a drunk. A football player in a suit.” – Cutler.

Cutler, a word of advice, don’t insult the wound-up man in front of you before all the other partners have weighed in. It’s not a wise plan. But you do have a way with words. Perhaps you might try your hand with tags? If a power shift comes, you might want to have a back-up plan.

Peggy Had a Baby

I love the callback to Peggy’s baby who would be near Julio’s age. Moss kills it in these scenes. You know she is remembering that baby without any wasted dialogue to cheapen it. Someone last night tweeted that they thought Peggy would be a great mom, and I agree. She’d be dedicated to her work, of course. But I have no doubt she’d be a terrific mother.

The Moon Landing

If you didn’t tear up watching the various gatherings and reactions to the moon landing, you’re made of sterner stuff than I. And you most certainly are anyway. But it was interesting to see how different people processed the momentous success. “Bravo.” – Bert who thankfully got to see them land before he died. I’m so glad to see that the Burger Chef team had zero interest in any impact that the landing might have on their presentation. They were all fully caught up in the spirit of the event. Not that I would expect otherwise. How could you at that time be anything other than overwhelmed by the magical wonder of humans reaching a realm never before breached. Well, except for Sally’s crush who wants to posture and show off. And then Don, who can still be swept away by magic, calls Sally. I love that conversation between a typical teenager whose hormones are on overdrive and her parent. Sally can muster only minimal enthusiasm for a phone call with her dad, but you see in her actions that the conversation made an impact on her despite all appearances.

I say, and I’m not sure that others will agree, that Sally went after star child because of Don’s reaction to the moon landing. And I’m really gratified to see the relationship between Don and Sally on such solid footing. It’s my second favorite relationship of the series: second only to Don and Peggy’s. I also say, and everyone else says the same thing I’m sure, that Sally standing outside smoking is a mirror image of Betty. I don’t think that bodes well for Sally’s character arc.

The Burger Chef Presentation

“We have no liquor.” – Peggy

I love the Peggy and Don scene. Don insists that Peggy give the presentation, not only because he knows she needs it to retain the business for herself in the event he’s fired, but because he knows she can win the business. It’s nice forward movement on their relationship that was healed so nicely in the last episode, and it’s more evidence of Don’s respect for her that Peggy has earned and needs to hear. It’s a great effect to have us experience the beginning of the BC presentation from Peggy’s perspective. It’s a real men’s club, and I felt just as nervous as I was supposed to feel. When she coughed, my throat responded by feeling less tight. Don’s opener was short and simple, yet set her up having to hit a home run. And I’ll admit I watched Don’s face in the background as she began, and I thought his face showed a lot of tension. I thought that was troublesome as you wouldn’t want to appear anything other than confident and supportive when someone on your team is presenting. But I realized that Don hasn’t played this role before and doesn’t know how to let go of the reins. He has no idea how to truly trust someone else in this situation. I believe he fully trusted Peggy to deliver, but he couldn’t control his expressions because he’s had no practice. But Don’s inability to fully control his reactions didn’t matter because Peggy nailed it! And the look that Peggy and Don share as she begins to deliver the details of the ad is intimate and earned and made the hostility that she showed to Don upon his return to the agency more bearable in the end.

Roger Makes His Power Play

I didn’t know Roger had a power play of this magnitude left in him until Bert died. The seeds were sowed in “The Strategy,” of course. I know Roger could have put this together with Don’s help, but I enjoyed watching Roger make the magic happen on his own. I just wish it was a different play. I realized watching it all play out, that I was, and still am, hoping for a Don, Pete, and Peggy agency. I’m happy with this as a stopgap, however.

Notes

  • The way Don’s secretary gives him the news about his firing was particularly funny. And then, particularly weird when you think back to all the times when Don took “liberties” when he shouldn’t have. And then, funny again.

  • Pete was funnier than ever this episode.

During the “private” call between Cutler and Chaough, Pete makes clear he’s been listening in the entire time because he can’t contain himself any longer.

“That is a very sensitive piece of horseflesh. He shouldn’t be rattled!”

“Marriage is a racket!”

“I’ve got 10 percent!” Pete says with glee upon hearing about the McCann deal.

  • I’m going to need a bigger Lou funeral pyre, metaphorically speaking. I certainly hope that we witness a spectacular Lou/Don showdown when the series returns to wrap everything up next year. I need more of Lou’s wonky underbite coupled with powerless indignation!
  • The Burger Chef presentation prep was fun to watch if only to see the genesis for Harry’s failure to sign off on his partnership in time; to see how much faith Don has in Peggy as he tells Pete not to worry about the specifics about what Peggy will say; and to see Don’s face as he registers that Pete’s so utterly certain that Don will be perfect that he doesn’t even need to see him present even the generalities, let alone the specifics. It’s the moon landing that holds them all hostage.
  • Did you see the smile on Ken’s face when Joan says to Harry, “You’re not a partner, yet.” He can deliver a smug grin with a patch just fine. Huzzah, Aaron Staton!
  • I thought Megan could have timed her revealing to Don that they had finally officially broken up a little better. Maybe give it another day or two for him to digest what just happened. After all, he wasn’t going to relocate to California in the next day. He’s reeling from this move by Cutler. But they both knew it was over when she moved her things over her last visit, even though Don refused to acknowledge it. If I let the timing go, I can acknowledge that that final call was quietly dignified and appropriate for the relationship that they shared. As far as Don’s horribly dysfunctional relationships go, his with Megan was heartwarming at times.
  • I loved seeing that Roger and Mona watched the moon landing together.
  • When Roger’s voice breaks as he tells Don that he’s going to lose him too, I almost teared up. FINE! I did tear up!
  • I watched Don’s and Pete’s faces when Peggy mentioned the 10yo boy in her apartment, but I only detected the slightest of reactions on Pete’s face and virtually none on Don’s. I’m not entirely surprised by Don’s non-reaction, but I was actually expecting a little more reaction from Pete. However, this is Pete. He’s probably not thought about that child in years, so the reaction was probably spot on.

See You Next Year

And now I can go read the other reviews to see how much I got wrong about this season finale. It was wonderful and impressive, and I don’t know how I’m going to make it a year until the remaining 7 episodes air.